Next Generation of Landscape Architecture Leaders Focus on Climate, Equity, and Technology

Next Generation of Landscape Architecture Leaders Focus on Climate, Equity, and Technology

“Our fellows have shown courage, written books, founded mission-driven non-profits, created new coalitions, and disseminated new tools,” said Cindy Sanders, FASLA, CEO of OLIN, in her introduction of the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) Fellowship for Innovation and Leadership program at Arena Stage in Washington, D.C.

Sanders highlighted the results of a five-year assessment of the LAF fellowship program and its efforts to grow the next generation of diverse landscape architecture leaders. The assessment shows that past fellows are shaping the future of the built environment in key public, non-profit, and private sector roles.

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And she introduced the latest class of six fellows, who focused on climate, equity, technology, and storytelling:


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Chris Hardy, ASLA, senior associate at Sasaki, used his fellowship to significantly advance the Carbon Conscience tool he has been developing over the past few years. The web-based tool is meant to help landscape architects, planners, urban designers, and architects make better land-use decisions in early design phases when the opportunity to reduce climate impacts is greatest.

Carbon Conscience is also designed to work in tandem with the Pathfinder tool, created by LAF Fellow Pamela Conrad, ASLA, as part of Climate Positive Design. Once the parameters of a site have been established, Pathfinder enables landscape architects to improve their designs and materials choices to reach a climate positive state faster.

Hardy examined more than 300 studies to develop robust evidence to support a fully revamped version of Carbon Conscience, which will launch in July 2023. He found that “landscape architecture projects can be just as carbon intensive as architecture projects per square foot.” He wondered whether the only climate responsible approach is to stop building new projects altogether. “Are new projects worth the climate cost?”

After months of research, he believes decarbonizing landscape architecture projects will be “very hard,” but not impossible. He called for a shift away from the carbon-intensive designs of the past. To reduce emissions, landscape architects need to take a “less is more” approach; use local and natural materials; and increase space in their projects for ecological restoration, which can boost carbon sequestration. He cited Sasaki’s 600-acre mega-project in Athens Greece — the Ellinikon Metropolitan Park — as a model for how to apply Carbon Conscience, make smart design decisions, and significantly improve carbon performance upfront. “There are exciting design opportunities — this is not just carbon accounting.”

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Ellinikon Metropolitan Park / Sasaki. Image © Sasaki
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Ellinikon Metropolitan Park / Sasaki. Image © Sasaki

Landscape architect Erin Kelly, ASLA, based in Detroit, Michigan, sees enormous potential in using vacant land in cities for carbon sequestration. Her goal is to connect vacant lands with the growing global offset marketplace, which offered 155 million offsets in 2022 that earned $543 million. And

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Organic Electronics Market to Hit USD 381 billion by 2032

Market.Us

Market.Us

“Organic materials are usually better for the environment than the usual non-organic stuff in electronics. This matches the rising need for eco-friendly technology. Ongoing research makes organic materials work even better, so they can be used in more ways.”

New York, Sept. 05, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — According to Market.us, The Global Organic Electronics Market Size accounted for USD 58 billion in 2022 and is estimated to garner a market size of USD 381 billion by 2032; rising at a CAGR of 21.3% from 2023 to 2032.

The organic electronics market for the sector focused on the development, production, and application of electronic devices and components using organic materials like organic semiconductors and conductive polymers. These materials exhibit properties that enable the formation of flexible, lightweight, and price-effective electronics, including displays, sensors, photovoltaics, and wearable devices. This market’s growth is driven by advancements in organic materials, the potential for larger area manufacturing, and the potential for innovative applications in different industries like consumer electronics, healthcare, and energy.

organic electronics market

organic electronics market

To get additional highlights on major revenue-generating segments, Request an Organic Electronics Market sample report at https://market.us/report/organic-electronics-market/request-sample/

Key Takeaway:

  • By Material, the semiconductor held a significant market share of 42% in 2022.

  • By Components, the active held a significant market share of 63% in 2022.

  • By Application, the display segment has dominated the market, growing at a CAGR of 32.1% from 2023 to 2032.

  • By End-User, the consumer electronics segment has dominated the market.

  • In 2022, North America dominated the market with the highest revenue share of 35.2%.

  • Asia-Pacific will grow at the highest CAGR of 29.8% from 2023-2032.

Factors Affecting the Growth of the Organic Electronics Market

  • Flexible and Lightweight Devices: Organic materials allow for the creation of flexible and lightweight electronic devices, enabling innovative applications like foldable displays and wearable electronics.

  • Energy Efficiency: Organic electronic components can be energy-efficient, leading to longer battery life and reduced power consumption in various devices.

  • Cost-Effectiveness: Organic materials can be produced using relatively low-cost manufacturing techniques, potentially reducing production costs for electronics.

  • Large-Area Manufacturing: Organic electronics can be fabricated over large areas using techniques like printing and roll-to-roll processing, offering scalability and lower production costs.

  • Environmental Sustainability: Organic materials are often more environmentally friendly than traditional inorganic materials used in electronics, aligning with the growing demand for sustainable technologies.

  • Innovative Applications: Organic electronics enable novel applications such as flexible displays, electronic skin, smart textiles, and biodegradable electronics.

  • Rapid Technological Advancements: Ongoing research and development efforts lead to continuous improvements in organic materials’ performance, boosting their suitability for a wider range of applications.

To understand how our report can make a difference to your business strategy, Inquire about a brochure at https://market.us/report/organic-electronics-market/#inquiry

Top Trends in the Global Organic Electronics Market

A number of revolutionary phenomena are now influencing the trajectory of the worldwide market for organic electronics and its effects across sectors. The incorporation of organic electronics into wearable technology and smart fabrics is one of the dominant themes.

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