Enel CEO skeptical of carbon seize and storage technological innovation

The CEO of multinational Italian strength company Enel has expressed question on the usefulness of carbon capture and storage, suggesting the technology is not a climate solution.

“We have tried and experimented with — and when I say ‘we’, I imply the electric power industry,” Francesco Starace explained to CNBC’s Karen Tso on Wednesday.

“You can think about, we tried out challenging in the previous 10 several years — it’s possible far more, 15 many years — simply because if we had a trustworthy and economically attention-grabbing resolution, why would we go and shut down all these coal vegetation [when] we could decarbonize the method?”

The European Fee, the EU’s govt arm, has described carbon capture and storage as a suite of technologies concentrated on “capturing, transporting, and storing CO2 emitted from ability plants and industrial facilities.”

The idea is to stop CO2 “achieving the atmosphere, by storing it in appropriate underground geological formations.”

The Fee has reported the utilization of carbon seize and storage is “important” when it arrives to encouraging lessen greenhouse gasoline emissions. This see is primarily based on the competition that a considerable proportion of equally business and electric power era will nevertheless be reliant on fossil fuels in the decades ahead.

Examine far more about clean up electrical power from CNBC Pro

Enel’s Starace, however, seemed skeptical about carbon capture’s probable.

“The fact is, it won’t do the job, it has not labored for us so much,” he reported. “And there is a rule of thumb here: If a know-how will not definitely pick up in five decades — and here we’re talking about more than 5, we are talking about 15, at minimum — you better drop it.”

There are other local weather solutions, Starace claimed. “Fundamentally, halt emitting carbon,” he said.

“I’m not expressing it is not value seeking yet again but we are not likely to do it. It’s possible other industries can consider more challenging and realize success. For us, it is not a solution.”

Carbon capture technological innovation is normally held up as a supply of hope in minimizing worldwide greenhouse fuel emissions, showcasing prominently in countries’ climate strategies as well as the web-zero approaches of some of the world’s biggest oil and fuel businesses.

Proponents of these technologies believe they can engage in an critical and varied part in conference international energy and weather ambitions.

Local climate researchers, campaigners and environmental advocacy teams, however, have extensive argued that carbon seize and storage technologies extend the world’s fossil gas dependency and distract from a a lot-essential pivot to renewable alternatives.

Options to raise shareholder dividends

Starace was talking following Enel published a strategic approach for 2022-24 and laid out its aims for the decades ahead. Among other issues, Enel will make direct investments of 170 billion euros ($190.7 billion) by 2030.

Immediate investments in renewable energy assets that Enel will own are set to strike 70 billion euros. Consolidated mounted renewable capacity, or potential that is immediately owned by Enel,

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5D data storage technology offers 10,000 times the density of Blu-ray

By deploying cutting-edge lasers and a little problem-solving, scientists at the University of Southampton have achieved a data storage breakthrough that offers both incredible density and long-term archiving capabilities. The technology is said to be capable of storing 500 terabytes on a single CD-sized disc, with the creators imagining it finding use in preserving everything from information for museums and libraries to data on a person’s DNA.

The technology is what is known as five-dimensional (5)D optical storage and it is one the University of Southampton team has been pursuing for a while. It was first demonstrated back in 2013, with the scientists successfully using the format to record and retrieve a 300-kb text file, though they harbored much loftier ambitions than that.

The data is written using a femtosecond laser, which emits incredibly short but powerful pulses of light, forging tiny structures in glass that are measured on the nanoscale. These structures contain information on the intensity and polarization of the laser beam, in addition to their three spatial dimensions, which is why the scientists refer to it as 5D data storage.

In 2015, the team demonstrated their progress by using the technology to save digital copies of major documents such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the King James Bible and the Magna Carta. As opposed to typical hard-drive memory that is vulnerable to high temperatures, moisture, magnetic fields and mechanical failure, this “eternal” 5D data storage promised incredible thermal stability and a virtually unlimited lifetime at room temperature.

One thing the scientists have been working to address, however, is the ability to write data at fast enough speeds and at high enough densities for real-world applications. They now claim to have achieved this by using an optical phenomenon called near-field enhancement, which enables them to create the nanostructures with a few weak light pulses rather than writing with the femtosecond laser directly. This allows data to be written at 1,000,000 voxels per second, which equates to 230 kb of data, or more than 100 pages of text, per second.

“This new approach improves the data writing speed to a practical level, so we can write tens of gigabytes of data in a reasonable time,” says Yuhao Lei from the University of Southampton in the UK. “The highly localized, precision nanostructures enable a higher data capacity because more voxels can be written in a unit volume. In addition, using pulsed light reduces the energy needed for writing.”

University of Southampton scientists have used their cutting-edge 5D data storage tech to save around 5 GB of information onto a one-inch silica glass sample

Yuhao Lei and Peter G. Kazansky, University of Southampton

The team demonstrated this technique by writing 5 GB of text data onto a silica glass disc around the size of a CD with almost 100 percent readout accuracy, though the researchers say such a disc would be capable of holding 500 TB of data, making it 10,000 times denser than a Blu-ray disc. The researchers

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