Harvard professor Avi Loeb finds fragments in ocean that may perhaps be alien

These pictured fragments are what Harvard professor Avi Loeb believes could be evidence of an alien technology from a mysterious meteor that crashed into Earth in 2014.

An astrophysicist at Harvard University thinks he could have found evidence of extraterrestrial everyday living not by researching the vast evening sky, but by combing the base of the Pacific Ocean.

Past thirty day period, a crew aboard a boat referred to as the Silver Star embarked on an expedition to Papua New Guinea with the mission of recovering fragments from a mysterious meteor that experienced crashed into Earth in 2014.

Throughout the two-7 days excursion, the group scoured around 100 miles of ocean mattress ahead of recovering 50 little spheres composed of a metallic substance they say is unmatched to any present alloys in our solar program.

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The spheres — which are so miniscule that they involve a microscope to see — have to have additional testing to determine regardless of whether they’re pure or technological in nature. Depending on the conclusions, the objects could be the initial time that humanity has identified stable evidence of interstellar beings.

In other text, aliens.

“Our results open up a new frontier in astronomy of learning what lies outside the photo voltaic procedure as a result of microscopes instead than telescopes, stated Avi Loeb, a professor and astrophysicist at Harvard University, who led the expedition as its main scientist.

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The fragments the workforce uncovered are believed to be from a basketball-sized meteorite that in 2014 slammed into the Earth’s ambiance and into the western Pacific Ocean.

Originating from exterior the photo voltaic system, the meteor moved at a speed two situations faster than just about all of the stars in the vicinity of the sunlight, Loeb stated. Though also smaller to be seen by telescopes via its reflection of daylight, its collision with Earth produced a brilliant fireball recorded by U.S. govt sensors, Loeb included.

Loeb in 2019 discovered the meteor’s interstellar origin in a paper he co-wrote with Harvard undergraduate university student Amir Siraj. A few many years afterwards, U.S. Area Command even more verified in a 2022 letter to NASA that the object — deemed interstellar meteor, IM1 — came from another photo voltaic procedure.

The $1.5 million expedition that Loeb led was to get well the fragments remaining above from the explosion on the ground of the Pacific Ocean at its crash web page close to Manus Island in Papua New Guinea. Among June 14-28, the crew searched above 108 miles of the ocean ground by combing it with a sled complete of magnets connected to their boat.

A photo of the crew

Loeb mentioned it took times to get the magnetic sled on the ocean ground and a several more days immediately after that to comprehend just what the crew collected together the predicted path of the meteor — about 53 miles off the coastline of Manus Island.

“As we scooped the magnets, the most abundant substance hooked up to them was a black powder of volcanic ash,” he wrote

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