Ubisoft Cancels Four Games, Including Splinter Cell VR And Ghost Recon Frontline

On the same day that Ubisoft delayed Avatar: Frontiers of Pandora and a “smaller” premium game, the publisher also confirmed that it has canceled four games.

These include the Splinter Cell VR title and Ghost Recon: Frontline, as well as two unannounced titles that Ubisoft did not disclose.

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Now Playing: Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Frontline Announcement Trailer

While the Splinter Cell VR game has been canned, fans of the series are getting a remake of the original game. As for Ghost Recon: Frontline, this was a free-to-play battle royale game. As for the other two unannounced games that have now been canceled, it’s anyone’s guess as to what they might be.

Ubisoft did not give a reason for the cancellation of these four titles. Game development is a highly iterative process and games get canceled all the time, even if we never hear about them. For example, Blizzard cancels about 50% of the games that it begins development on.

While Ubisoft has canceled four games and delayed two others, the company has a number of big projects coming up, including Mario + Rabbids: Sparks of Hope and Skull and Bones, both of which are releasing this year. In September, Ubisoft will reveal “the future of Assassin’s Creed,” and many believe this pertains to the rumored new Assassin’s Creed game featuring Valhalla’s Basim.

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Assassin’s Creed Maker Ubisoft Will get Tech For Even Bigger Games

A large viking warrior overlooks a map covered in hundreds of icons.

Picture: Ubisoft / Kotaku

Above the weekend, as element of a preview in advance of this year’s GDC, Ubisoft uncovered a new cloud-based mostly technology it is producing. According to the Assassin’s Creed publisher, this new tech, named Scalar, will make it possible for its teams to create “even greater worlds” than what’s at this time achievable.

No, you read through that last sentence effectively. Ubisoft is threatening us with larger game titles, even as it releases game titles that are arguably much also big presently. And to that, I say: Ubisoft, quit and imagine about this. You should. I beg you.

Glance, I’m no Luddite. I like extravagant new know-how and program as significantly as the future human being. And from a complex standpoint Ubisoft’s new Scalar procedure seems interesting, as described by VentureBeat and GamesIndustry.biz. According to the publisher, the tech supports all platforms and can operate several parts of already-present Ubisoft video game engines—such as AI or physics systems—in the cloud, offloading the function across “a potentially unrestricted amount of equipment,” allowing for the organization to leverage in essence an “infinite volume of computing power.” It would also allow Ubisoft to update video games and include content to them without getting to thrust out specific platform patches.

Ubisoft explained a handful of unique methods for how this enormous increase in electric power could be applied in movie games, which include upcoming games staying capable to assist big numbers of on the internet players at a single time. Ubisoft also would like to create new sorts of video games that would be cost-free from possessing to depend on limited computing electricity, as is the circumstance for most video games right now.

“How do you reimagine what online games must be and what they could be in the long term, and then get started to create in direction of that to create new experiences?” stated Patrick Bach, managing director for Ubisoft Stockholm, in a push briefing. “Because in basic, online games are commonly an iteration of what it has accomplished ahead of. We want to split free of that and make anything huge.”

Hold out, hold up. Quit.

Ubisoft keeps chatting about developing games that are big, as if it hasn’t unveiled properly in excess of a dozen giant open up-earth online games that just take gamers months to distinct. Potentially Ubisoft does not think about all those games to be “big.” But if that is the circumstance, I’m genuinely frightened by no matter what Ubisoft will end up creating with this new Scalar tech. What does Ubisoft look at a large video game if Valhalla ain’t previously it?

A viking warrior with two axes yells while standing on a rock as seen in Assassin's Creed.

Image: Ubisoft

Ubisoft suggests Scalar tech is not for streaming games to gamers, like Stadia or Amazon’s Luna, but is alternatively meant to be applied by devs. The strategy is to give teams a lot more flexibility when generating online games, making it possible for them to believe outside of what a one PS5 or

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