Where to watch Summer Game Fest and Not-E3 2022 livestream news events

Just because E3 2022 isn’t happening officially doesn’t mean game developers and publishers are skipping out on a summer full of announcements. Microsoft, Capcom, Netflix, Devolver Digital, and many others have stepped in to fill the void, with the Geoff Keighley-led Summer Game Fest kicking off a week of livestreaming events showcasing hundreds of new and upcoming games.

A few major game publishers have already signaled that they won’t hold an E3-style showcase during this time. Electronic Arts and Ubisoft have already ruled out doing their respective events, EA Play and Ubisoft Forward, in June. Nintendo, as Nintendo does, is still a wild card. The company has not announced a Nintendo Direct for June … yet.

Here’s a breakdown of the colloquially known “Not-E3” schedule so far, and what to expect from each show.

Thursday, June 9

Summer Game Fest

11 a.m. PDT/2 p.m. EDT

The Game Awards host Geoff Keighley and friends promise a “cross-industry showcase of announcements and games” during Thursday’s stream. Confirmed to appear at the Summer Game Fest kickoff livestream are Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2, Gotham Knights, Cuphead: The Delicious Last Course, and The Callisto Protocol. The show, which is expected to run between 90 minutes and two hours, will feature “a couple of new game announcements” and some surprises, Keighley said. But he cautioned that Summer Games Fest will primarily focus on “stuff that is announced,” so keep your lofty expectations in check.

Where to watch: YouTube | Twitch | Twitter | Facebook

Day of the Devs: SGF Edition Showcase

Immediately following the Summer Game Fest livestream will be a new showcase from iam8bit and Double Fine Productions, where the focus will be on new and announced indie games. The Day of the Devs showcase will reveal a new game from Monument Valley developer Ustwo games alongside new trailers, updates, and game announcements.

Where to watch: YouTube | Twitch | Twitter | Facebook

Devolver Direct 2022

3 p.m. PDT/6 p.m. EDT

Expect hijinks, game announcements, and probably a few gallons of fake blood during Devolver Digital’s annual … thing that they do. Here’s the official description: “A clueless team of Devolver Digital execs, scrambling to produce a presentation, accidentally trigger a reality-bending, industry-wide event that threatens the very fabric of video game time and space.” In reality, Devolver will likely show some cool game trailers.

Where to watch: YouTube | Twitch | Twitter | Facebook

Friday, June 10

IGN Expo

9 a.m. PDT/12 p.m. EDT

Details are still scant, but IGN’s livestream promises “new announcements, never-before-seen gameplay, and exclusive gaming reveals.”

Where to watch: YouTube | Twitch | Twitter | Facebook

Netflix Geeked Week Games Showcase

10 a.m. PDT/1 p.m. EDT

Netflix is rolling out Geeked Week content all week, but Friday will highlight the streamer’s gaming-related content, including The Cuphead Show, Sonic Prime, Dota: Dragon’s Blood, and Tekken: Bloodline. It will also focus on Netflix’s games initiative, with “more than 10 Netflix

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Seven technologies to watch in 2022


The Telomere-to-Telomere Consortium is sequencing whole chromosomes.Credit: Adrian T. Sumner/SPL

From gene editing to protein-structure determination to quantum computing, here are seven technologies that are likely to have an impact on science in the year ahead.

Fully finished genomes

Roughly one-tenth of the human genome remained uncharted when genomics researchers Karen Miga at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Adam Phillippy at the National Human Genome Research Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, launched the Telomere-to-Telomere (T2T) consortium in 2019. Now, that number has dropped to zero. In a preprint published in May last year, the consortium reported the first end-to-end sequence of the human genome, adding nearly 200 million new base pairs to the widely used human consensus genome sequence known as GRCh38, and writing the final chapter of the Human Genome Project1.

First released in 2013, GRCh38 has been a valuable tool — a scaffold on which to map sequencing reads. But it’s riddled with holes. This is largely because the widely used sequencing technology developed by Illumina, in San Diego, California, produces reads that are accurate, but short. They are not long enough to unambiguously map highly repetitive genomic sequences, including the telomeres that cap chromosome ends and the centromeres that coordinate the partitioning of newly replicated DNA during cell division.

Long-read sequencing technologies proved to be the game-changer. Developed by Pacific Biosciences in Menlo Park, California, and Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) in Oxford, UK, these technologies can sequence tens or even hundreds of thousands of bases in a single read, but — at least at the outset — not without errors. By the time the T2T team reconstructed2,3 their first individual chromosomes — X and 8 — in 2020, however, Pacific Biosciences’ sequencing had advanced to the extent that T2T scientists could detect tiny variations in long stretches of repeated sequences. These subtle ‘fingerprints’ made long repetitive chromosome segments tractable, and the rest of the genome quickly fell into line. The ONT platform also captures many modifications to DNA that modulate gene expression, and T2T was able to map these ‘epigenetic tags’ genome-wide as well4.

The genome T2T solved was from a cell line that contains two identical sets of chromosomes. Normal diploid human genomes contain two versions of each chromosome, and researchers are now working on ‘phasing’ strategies that can confidently assign each sequence to the appropriate chromosome copy. “We’re already getting some pretty phenomenal phased assemblies,” says Miga.

This diploid assembly work is being conducted in collaboration with T2T’s partner organization, the Human Pangenome Reference Consortium, which aspires to produce a more representative genome map, based on hundreds of donors from around the world. “We’re aiming to capture an average of 97% of human allelic diversity,” says Erich Jarvis, one of the consortium’s lead investigators and a geneticist at the Rockefeller University in New York City. As chair of the Vertebrate Genomes Project, Jarvis also hopes to leverage these complete genome assembly capabilities to generate full sequences

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From Zoom to Disney+ watch parties: tech for family fun at Christmas | Zoom

With Omicron spreading in the UK the potential for disruptions to Christmas plans are high, whether you’re limiting your contacts or have been forced to isolate. But the fact you can’t meet in person doesn’t mean all the festivities have to stop.

It will not be quite the same but you can still join your family and friends and have a good time virtually. Here are some ideas to help keep you connected over the festive period – whether it’s checking in for a chat or sharing entertainment.

Easy video calling

A quick video call can keep someone involved in Christmas, even if they’re not in the same house with you. Photograph: ArtistGNDphotography/Getty Images

Video calls are most people’s first port of call. You can use almost any device with a camera, but tablets or laptops are the easiest to set up for longer chats if you have them.

Zoom is one of the easiest cross-platform services available with an app available for most devices. It can be used for free for up to 40 minutes at a time.

For those in the Apple ecosystem, FaceTime is built into every iPhone, iPad or Mac, is very easy to use and now you can send invites to those on Android or Windows for calls in their browser. Google users can use Meet on Android, in Chrome on a computer or iPhone and iPad apps.

Those sitting on their own should use headphones to avoid feedback and help keep conversations more natural, and shorter video chats are usually better to avoid fatigue. Place a tablet or laptop at the end of the table if someone can’t make a gathering.

Party games over video call

video call party games
Switch yelling out answers in person to shouting out guesses at a screen with charades and other party games over video call. Photograph: Canadian Press/REX/Shutterstock

Chats can get old quickly, so why not try party games over video calls. Some things are easier to do than others. Charades is a natural fit: just prop up your video calling device and make your shapes to the camera.

Pictionary is also fairly easy to do over a video call using pen and paper, or you can use a shared drawing service such as the free Microsoft Whiteboard to see what other people are drawing on their screens or tablets.

Quizzes are a video chat favourite, too. You can try using Google Docs or similar services, but the old(er) fashioned way of pen, paper and a bit of screen sharing if any pictures are involved often works better.

Share films, TV shows and music over video calls

apple shareplay
SharePlay now works on iPhones, iPads, Macs and Apple TV. Photograph: Apple Inc./EPA

The latest addition to the growing list of video call activities is watching videos or listening to music at the same time. Apple’s new SharePlay offering makes this easy – it’s built into FaceTime as of the latest software updates.

While you’re on a FaceTime call you can start watching

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