Wired2Fire Reaper gaming PC review

The prevailing wisdom is that pre-built systems are still the best way of getting an up-to-date graphics card. As prices for graphics cards normalise this may not be the case in the not too distant future, but right now, it’s still our recommendation for the most sought-after cards. Cards like the Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 you’ll find inside this new Wired2Fire Reaper gaming PC.

Wired2Fire has sought to piece together a machine that offers decent value for money, balancing the spec in order to hit its £1,649 price point. So while it employs one of the latest Intel Alder Lake CPUs, it isn’t the top model, but the more affordable Core i5 12600KF. 

Don’t let that put you off though, this is a phenomenal chip and indeed is our top recommendation for gaming CPUs right now. Sure, there are faster chips out there, but this hits that value for money sweet spot better than any other when it comes to gaming in 2022.

With that in mind, it shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise to learn that the Reaper ships with DDR4 memory as opposed to the newer DDR5. While it would have been great to have DDR5 in here—simply because it’s the latest standard and fully supported by this CPU—this decision means that the machine comes with 32GB of DDR4 for less than it would have cost to ship this with 16GB of DDR5. That’s a trade-off I can definitely get behind. 

Reaper specs

Wired2Fire Raptor PC on a desk

(Image credit: Future)

CPU: Intel Core i7 12600KF
GPU: Nvidia RTX 3070 8GB
RAM: 32GB DDR4-3600
Motherboard: MSI Z690-A Pro WIFI DDR4
CPU Cooler: Arctic Liquid Freezer II 240
Storage: 1TB NVMe SSD
PSU: MSI MAG A650BN 650W 80 Plus Bronze
Connectivity: 6x USB 2.0, 2x USB 3.0, 1x USB Type-C, RJ45, 6x Audio, Wi-Fi 6, PS/2 keboard/mouse, HDMI, DisplayPort, front audio
OS: Windows 11 Home
Warranty: 5 year
Price:
£1,649

Along with a quality graphics card in the shape of the RTX 3070, an awesome CPU, and a whopping 32GB of DDR4 memory, you also get a quality motherboard in the shape of the MSI Z690-A DDR4 WIFI, a 1TB NVMe SSD, and a quality CPU cooler. All of this is built neatly into a Lian Li Lancool II Mesh case. 

As the name suggests this is a mesh fronted case affording plenty of airflow, and thanks to the three RGB fans behind that mesh, it makes for quite the light show as well. It’s annoying that the front panel USB Type-C port has been blanked out though, especially as there is a connector on the motherboard. At least there is a USB Type-C port on the rear IO.

The only real mark against the Reaper is that the installed SSD is a PCIe 3.0 model. When you’re dropping as much money as this on a system, you want more than just competent, you want something special, and the Lexar 1TB SSD you’ll find inside this machine comes up short on

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New ContractWorks Review Reveals Lawful Technologies Adoption Will come with Superior Threat of Unsuccessful Implementation

Investigate reveals 77% of in-household counsel encounter unsuccessful engineering tasks, highlights keys for the effective implementation of present day lawful engineering

SANTA BARBARA, Calif., May well 04, 2022 (Globe NEWSWIRE) — ContractWorks, a foremost agreement management resolution for in-house lawful groups from SecureDocs, an Onit subsidiary, today unveiled the effects of a 3rd-party research spotlighting the obstacles of adopting legal engineering for company authorized functions groups. The study explores the causes for failed technological know-how implementations and identifies options to immediately and proficiently modernize legal operations.

ContractWorks commissioned Censuswide, a global insight-driven exploration corporation based mostly in the United Kingdom, to carry out a review of 350 in-property legal specialists across a vary of industries in the United States and United Kingdom. All respondents onboarded new technologies options since the commence of the COVID-19 pandemic, with far more than 50 % (57%) stating their team’s adoption of know-how was accelerated by at minimum a few a long time. However, far more than a few quarters of in-residence counsel (77%) knowledge failed know-how implementations and point out the most typical elements contributing to the failure as lengthy processes (38%), overcomplicated answers (36%) and technology unfit for their precise requirements (33%).

Other important findings consist of:

  • Nine out of 10 in-dwelling lawyers wrestle with technology methods applied by their businesses.

  • 29% doubt their employer understands what is ideal for the business soon after a failed technological innovation adoption.

  • 27% say a unsuccessful implementation would make them contemplate leaving their task, although one in four say it makes them resent their job.

On the other hand, the examine concludes that legal departments should really not be deterred by the risk of unsuccessful adoption. Automating time-consuming and handbook processes with user-welcoming, fast-to-apply and objective-built answers boosts operational effectiveness in just lawful companies, which in change moves their companies forward. When successfully implemented, legal engineering would make attorneys and lawful functions teams a lot more successful, much less probable to make errors and much more pleased with their do the job.

“To be certain the profitable adoption of legal know-how, firms must comply with 3 easy rules,” explained Mark Rhodes, Controlling Director of SecureDocs United kingdom. “First, concentration on the greatest precedence dilemma to resolve next, determine what a effective implementation appears to be like just before building an expenditure and third, get your end users on the journey with you due to the fact they are the kinds adopting and working with the technological know-how.”

To understand a lot more about ContractWorks, take a look at www.contractworks.com.

About ContractWorks
ContractWorks from SecureDocs is employed by hundreds of in-home lawful teams in organizations across the globe, enabling them to just take manage of their contracts by producing it much easier to execute, store, and monitor corporate agreements. Functions incorporate superior lookup with OCR, good doc tagging with AI, computerized alerts for vital dates, thorough reporting, and straightforward electronic signature. SecureDocs has workplaces in Santa Barbara, California and London, Uk and is a

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Apple Mac Studio review: finally

The Mac Studio is the computer everyone wanted the Mac Pro to be.

Apple’s 2019 desktop release was supposed to be the computer that professional Mac users had been waiting for. It was endlessly configurable with powerful Intel processors and AMD graphics chips, and its top-end configuration hovered around $52,000. After the abject failure of the trashcan 2013 Mac Pro, it was poised to be the first Apple machine that could legitimately provide the power that professionals in creative fields — historically, the folks who turn out in droves to buy these Apple machines — really need.

But while it was a gorgeous and powerful computer, it also had some issues. We bought a $16,599 model, and while that wasn’t the most specced-out option, it was one that creative professionals around The Verge and Vox Media felt could handle their heavy editing workloads. We gave that computer to all kinds of artists, producers, and designers. And they didn’t love it. They didn’t feel it was any faster than their years-old setups, and they ran into all the same issues they always did. In particular, not enough software was optimized for that Mac Pro’s approach to high-performance desktop computing, especially when it came to GPUs.

Since then, Apple has committed to making its own Apple Silicon chips, moving away from Intel and AMD. The first line of those chips, the M1 series, has been a smashing success in Mac laptops, the iMac, and the Mac Mini. And now it’s in the new Mac Studio, which comes in configurations with the M1 Max and new M1 Ultra chips. The Studio is Apple’s first professional computer running Apple Silicon, and with it comes a new way of designing chips that makes it easier for apps to access all the performance available.

I’ve, once again, given this device to a host of professionals on The Verge’s team, and the reactions I saw couldn’t be more different from those we saw in 2020. They were impressed. For their workloads, it’s faster than anything they’ve ever used. It’s changed what they can do.

So I’m relieved that I can finally, finally write this in a review: the Mac Studio is the computer professional Mac users have been waiting for.

The Mac Studio is a nice-looking, compact computer. Someone mentioned to me that it looks like two Apple TVs stacked on top of each other, and now I can’t unsee it. You might also see it as a taller Mac Mini — either way, it’s a design Apple fans have seen before.

Like the Mac Mini, the Studio is designed to sit on your desk — it has the exact same footprint, just about twice as tall. It’s not like the Mac Pro that lives on

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Gran Turismo 7 review: the grandaddy of racing games

As a splash screen reminds you when you boot up Gran Turismo 7, this is the 25th-anniversary year of Sony’s flagship PlayStation racing game. It’s also been more than eight years and one whole console generation since we last saw a mainline, numbered entry in the series, the 2013 PlayStation 3 swan song Gran Turismo 6. These long spans of time loom large over the new game. Maybe they explain why it’s so preoccupied with legacy.

In the quarter century since “the real driving simulator” became a sensation with its involved physics and grainy photorealism, our relationship with cars has changed. Climate change has forced a reevaluation, and the internal combustion engine is on the way out. Can cars even be cool in 2022? “You won’t find as many people talking about car culture anymore,” director Kazunori Yamauchi said recently, adding that GT7 had been built with this new reality in mind.

Our relationship with racing games has changed, too, in the years since Gran Turismo 6. Back then, its main competitor was the Forza Motorsport series, which was made in GT’s image. Today, an upstart spinoff from those games has become a popular phenomenon by putting vibes first and borrowing the design of open-world adventures, culminating in the magnificent Forza Horizon 5, in which the cars — and the racing — were only part of the point.

Image: Polyphony Digital/Sony Interactive Entertainment

In 2017, though, developer Polyphony Digital looked to the future with Gran Turismo Sport, a multiplayer-first, live-service-inspired detour. It got many things right, not least the way it brought driver and safety rating systems from hardcore simulator iRacing into a more approachable arena. But it launched as a slender shadow of what the public expects of a Gran Turismo game; a traditional single-player campaign was only patched in as an afterthought, and many GT features, including the car modification system that has always been a hallmark of the series, never made it in.

This is the world Yamauchi and his team strive to confront in Gran Turismo 7. They seem to want it to be the Gran Turismo that fans remember, with all the features they love. They want — quite desperately, it seems — to get people excited about cars again. They want this all-encompassing series to carry all its baggage, plus over a century of motoring history, into the future.

It’s a testament to their enormous skill and passion that they largely succeed. Despite its big ambitions and wealth of content, Gran Turismo 7 always feels slick and manageable, and it’s a treat to see Polyphony bring its renowned technical gloss to the PlayStation 5. But still, it’s not what you would call light on its feet. At times it seems hemmed in by tradition, and at others, held back by a heavy guiding hand.

a blue Porsche 911 sits outside the Gran Turismo Café in Gran Turismo 7

Image: Polyphony Digital/Sony Interactive Entertainment

That’s not to say it’s without the eccentric flights of fancy that have long livened up a series with

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Alienware x14 review: A portable gaming laptop that doesn’t suck

For years, Alienware eschewed thin-and-light gaming laptops, opting instead to make slightly bulkier systems with more affordable pricing. But all that changed last year with the introduction of its X-series notebooks. And now, Alienware is pushing its quest for sleekness even further with the new x14, the company’s thinnest and lightest gaming laptop yet. To add even more rum to the punch, the x14 is also one of the first gaming laptops available featuring Intel’s latest 12th-gen mobile CPUs. And while the x14 isn’t without its quirks, the result is a machine that makes me wish Alienware had gotten into portable gaming rigs years ago.

Design

Sporting Alienware’s Legend 2.0 design language, the x14 is without a doubt a striking system, though ultimately you’ll need to decide how much you fancy its sci-fi aesthetics. What’s not in question is the laptop’s thinness, which stands at just 0.57 inches thick while weighing barely more than four pounds. That’s even thinner and almost a pound lighter than the x15 (0.63 inches and 5 pounds), while making Alienware’s more mainstream M15 R7 seem almost bloated (0.8 inches and 5.3 pounds).

Pros

  • Slick design
  • Vibrant screen with Dolby Vision
  • Highly portable
  • USB-C power brick
  • Good performance and value for the size

Cons

  • Somewhat cramped keyboard layout
  • No side-mounted ports
  • Noisy fans
  • Mediocre 720p webcam
  • Short battery life during gameplay

Sam Rutherford/Engadget

Now I’m not normally the type to lust after a few ounces or tenths of an inch getting shaved off a device, but on the x14, every little reduction matters. That’s because while most gaming laptops don’t even come close to fitting in my everyday messenger bag that’s not meant to stash anything larger than a 13-inch ultraportable, the x14 actually fits, if just barely.

That means I’m much more likely to bring this thing with me on trips, which is kind of the whole point of a thin-and-light gaming notebook. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate beastly 17-inch gaming rigs, but when my back starts to hurt at the mere thought of carrying one around, in practice those systems often function more like mobile desktops than any sort of travel-friendly gaming machine.

Alienware's new dual-torque hinge for the x14 helps increase screen stability white reducing excess size and weight.

Sam rutherford/Engadget

The main innovation on the x14 is Alienware’s new dual-torque hinge which adds strength and stability to the laptop’s display, while once again reducing weight and thickness compared to previous X-series machines. And, as you’d expect from Alienware, the x14 comes with customizable RGB lighting on its lid and keyboard. That said, compared to its larger siblings you do lose the extra RGB light ring that would normally outline the system’s rear ports. (Fun fact: That pill-like shape is actually called a stadium.) Inside, there’s a lovely soft-touch finish on x14’s wrist rest, which may feel a bit cramped for people with larger hands.

Display and sound

On the x14 there’s only one display option, and it’s a good one. The 144Hz 1,920 x 1,080 screen is plenty sharp, while support for NVIDIA’s G-Sync helps

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iBuypower Intel 12th Gen Z690 i7 DDR4 Gaming PC Review: One Way to Get Parts

Let me tell you a story: Back in 2020 the world shut down, and a confluence of supply and demand issues, a chip shortage, surging cryptocurrencies and a global pandemic made a number of tech-related products difficult to impossible to buy. Flash forward to today and things are still sort of that way–at least when it comes to graphics cards.

These ongoing issues continue to drive the sales of pre-built systems, including those on our list of the best gaming PCs. With the launch of Intel’s 12th Gen “Alder Lake” chips, which are particularly impressive when it comes to gaming, iBuypower has released its “iBuypower Intel 12th Gen Z690 i7 DDR4 Gaming” PC. The name is definitely a mouthful, but it’s more of a configurator for numerous Intel-based PCs than anything else. And there’s a fair bit to like when it comes to performance.

The iBuypower model we reviewed sports an Intel Core i7-12700K, an Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 and one of iBuypower’s own cases. And in our testing, it held up against and/or surpassed last year’s models, though there is some room for improvement.

Design of the iBuypower 12th Gen Z690 i7 Gaming PC

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iBuypower 12th Gen Z690 i7 DDR4 Gaming

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
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iBuypower 12th Gen Z690 i7 DDR4 Gaming

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)
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iBuypower 12th Gen Z690 i7 DDR4 Gaming

(Image credit: Tom’s Hardware)

This PC was built in iBuypower’s own Slate Hako MR case, which is a pretty standard case with a dash of attitude.

It’s hard not to notice the very front of the case, which is a bit unusual. It’s tempered glass, which shows off three 240 mm case fans in their RGB glory. It’s a dark glass, however, which makes it highly reflective and only shows the most lit-up parts. If you don’t have a lot of RGB, you won’t be able to see your parts well. Whether or not that’s a pro or a con is a matter of personal taste.

There’s a bit of venting on the right side of the case to let in some air, but there’s also some smack dab in the middle of the front. The effect kind of looks like a lightning bolt, but with a space in the middle to allow for a bit of airflow. Both edges of the bolt overlap to create a layered effect. Between the lightning and the pattern, my wife referred to it as “very David Bowie,” which I’m told was a compliment. But if you don’t like the look, iBuypower offers a staggering 19 other options, although some add significantly to the price of the system.

The left side of the desktop features more tempered glass, letting you see into the case. For our review unit, that featured a smattering of RGB on the four case fans and on the pump for the CPU cooler. I’m of the opinion that this is a tasteful amount of lights. The right side panel, like on many cases, is an aluminum door that slides off.

There are a

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